Illumination - Muswellbrook High School Photography Students

Muswellbrook High School

Photography Students

 

Muswellbrook High School students explore ways in which the history of the invisible or the forgotten
can be illuminated and documented through the medium of photography.

Travelling to the Biennale of Sydney to experience the international festival of contemporary art, the
students visited Cockatoo Island and documented variousaspects of the location as a place of change
and diverse histories.

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Exhibiting from 13 May to 1 July 2018. Opening night 6pm Saturday 12 May 2018. Free entry with
refreshments courtesy of Hollydene Estate Wines, Hunter Belle Cheese and Pukara Estate.

Kate RowlandsCockatoo Island 2018, digital output print.

 

 

 

 

 

The Joy of Colour - Tia Gabriellah

 

 

 

 

 

For Muswellbrook artist Tia Gabriellah, painting which began as a form of therapy has grown to become her all-consuming passion, herself redefined as an artist. She holds the firm belief that art has the power to heal and bring joy to the world; her colourful impastolandscape and flower paintings, in oils or acrylics on canvas, designed to transport the viewer to a place of beauty.

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 Exhibiting from 13 May to 1 July 2018. Opening night 6pm Saturday 12 May 2018. Free entry with
refreshments courtesy of Hollydene Estate Wines, Hunter Belle Cheese and Pukara Estate.

Artwork: Tia Gabriellah, Barrington Mountains 2018 (detail), acrylic on canvas.

 

 

 

Last Bus to Riley Street - Max Watters

 

Last Bus to Riley Street

 The Max Watters Preview Exhibition for 2018

 This year’s preview of Max Watters’ latest group of
paintings will be the last to travel on from the
Muswellbrook Regional Arts Centre to the Watters
Gallery in Riley Street East Sydney. Sadly after 54 years
the Watters Gallery will close at the end of 2018. This
is the end of an era for Australian art. The Watters
Gallery has been at the forefront of the avant garde and
the very best that Australian art has had to offer since its
inception in 1964. Max Watters held his first solo
exhibition at the Watters Gallery in 1966 and has
continued to exhibit there every year or two till the
present. The close connection between the Watters
Gallery and its directors Alex and Geoffrey Legge and
Frank Watters (Max’s older brother) and the
Muswellbrook Regional Arts Centre is directly related 

 

 

 

 

 

to the connection between Max and the Upper Hunter.
Max has been painting the built environment of the
rural Upper Hunter since 1962 - this is his subject, it is
what he loves and his paintings have recorded the slow
demise of a bygone time of slab huts, Georgian
architecture and bush carpentry. The buildings Max has
carefully rendered into his singular style of geometry
and texture have reached the end of their natural life,
every day another old building falls down, every day the
questions about the future of the Upper Hunter mount
up and Max Watters latest paintings reflect and ask
these same questions.

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Exhibiting from 13 May to 1 July 2018. Opening night
6pm Saturday 12 May 2018. Free entry with 
refreshments courtesy of Hollydene Estate Wines,
Hunter Belle Cheese and Pukara Estate.
 
 

Hunterbelle logo

Photo: Brad Franks,
Max Watters, in the Winter Studio.

 

 

Ancient Stories, New Narratives - New works from the Sims Dickson Collection

 

21st Century Aboriginal Women’s Art from the Desert

New works from the Sims Dickson Collection 

New developments in desert art include both the
innovation of artists confident to work at ever larger
scale, and also the creation of intimate insights into
their daily lived experiences. 

Featuring stunning tjukurpa paintings by senior artists
such as Angkaliya Curtis, Yaritji Young, Carleen West
and Tjaruwa Woods, alongside honest and moving
narratives of contemporary life, including the ongoing
effects of the Maralinga tests, chronic renal disease,
poverty and alcohol abuse. Together these recent
paintings, ceramics and
tjanpi weaving provide a cogent
snapshot of the current 'state of the art' from desert
communities and town camps. 

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Exhibiting from 13 May to 1 July 2018. Opening night
6pm Saturday 12 May 2018. Free entry with
refreshments courtesy of Hollydene Estate Wines,
Hunter Belle Cheese and Pukara Estate.

Hunterbelle logo 

Artwork: Sally M Mulda Nangala, Abbott’s Camp
2016 (detail), acrylic on linen, 125 x 200cm, painted at
Tangentyere Artists, Alice Springs, Sims Dickson
Collection.

Ancient Stories New Narratives Catalogue

Coming in Waves - Sue Beiboer

Sue Beiboer

Opening: 6pm Friday 5 January 2018
Exhibition: 6 January to 4 March 2018

Coming in Waves is a body of work centred on the sea and the debris, both natural and man-made, left behind by the tide. The images depict the intricate details and patterns found in the shells, weeds and other sea life on the shoreline. These objects may not be considered in themselves beautiful, however when removed from their normally distracting context and reimagined through drawings and etchings a new aesthetic is achieved. The detailed imagery dissolves away into a fine line work of pixelations. Man-made objects appear comfortably within the composition, camouflaged amongst naturally occurring ocean debris. The pixelated imagery references the slow return of each object to its original components or elements thus reflecting on the transience of life.

Etched imagery takes the sea motif in a new direction, simplifying forms and creating a graphic representation of the subject. These works explore the dynamic possibilities of line work and colour, amplifying the beauty of the subject through repetition.

This body of work aims to draw the viewer closer, the intrigue of the details enabling the viewer to see and appreciate the beauty of these forms. The subtle inclusion of unnatural objects, shifts the focus, disrupting the harmony of the imagery. Whilst the sea life will decompose and benefit the ecosystem, man-made synthetic objects will not.

Image: Sue Beiboer

Stencil Art Prize 2017

Justinas Zozo (Lithuania), King Fisher (detail), aerosol on canvas.

06 January - 04 March 2018

Opening Night 6pm Friday 5 January 2018

Showcasing 67 stencil artists from 25 countries, the Stencil Art Prize is the world’s largest stencil event. Influenced by the ephemeral nature of street art, these stencil-based works blend pop-culture imagery and global politics to highlight the growing concerns of a socially engaged generation of artists.

This exhibition is a unique collection of works from Australia, Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Cyprus, England, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Japan, Lithuania, Mexico, New Zealand, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Syria, Thailand, United Kingdom and USA.

Highlights of the exhibition include the Austrian duo Jana & JS with their intimate style of portraiture; David Soukup (USA) and his internationally acclaimed Chicago fire escapes; Iranian artist Afshid with his portrayal of refugees, migration and heritage; Mue Bon’s (Thailand) playful take on capitalism and Australia’s own Kirpy who has layered dozens of street posters as a base upon which to create a streetscape.

The stencil artists in this exhibition encompass nearly every stencil making method on the planet including hand drawn and hand cut stencils, computer generated stencil layers, silk screen stencils and screen printing processes, collage and mixed media stencils, spray paint techniques, water colour, ink and more.

Artworks and print editions of the stencils are for sale at www.stencilartprize.com

Stencil Art Prize logo

Reflecting on Nature: Birdlife studies in oil and through the lens - Bernice, Mark and Mitchell O'Mahoney

Mitchell O’Mahoney, Red Backed Fairy Wrens 2017, oil on silver.

Opening: 6pm Friday 5 January 2018
Exhibition: 6 January to 4 March 2018

Mitchell O’Mahoney, Hunter Valley portrait artist and drawing teacher, has put aside his portrait subjects and teamed up with wildlife photographers Bernice and Mark O’Mahoney for this collection of parallel works – Reflecting on Nature.

Bernice and Mark O’Mahoney began photography as a pursuit to complement their interest in Australian bush, its wildlife and native plants. Their objective is to observe, photograph and identify as much as possible of the unique flora and fauna this great country has to offer. The photographs included in this exhibition are a selection from their Australian birdlife series.

Drawing on the Australian birdlife captured by Bernice and Mark, Mitchell’s own unique portrayal of Australian birdlife, executed in oil on silver, features a role-reversal of sorts in which the viewer affects the subject by contributing one’s own colour and movement for a changeable visual experience.

Image: Mitchell O’Mahoney, Red Backed Fairy Wrens 2017, oil on silver.